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Governance &
Structure Division
 

General Election FAQs & Answers

 

The information provided below is intended to address questions commonly raised by candidates, election officials and the general public in previous general local elections. 

 

 

Disclaimer
The questions and answers below have been provided as general reference and while all attempts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the answers, they are not a substitute for provincial legislation. 

Please refer directly to the latest consolidation of provincial statutes at BC Laws (www.bclaws.ca) for specific election-related provisions and requirements within the Local Government Act, Local Elections Campaign Financing Act, School Act, or Vancouver Charter

 


General Questions


When are general local elections held?

General local elections are held every four years.

The next general local election is November 15, 2014. Voting places are open from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. local time.

What jurisdictions hold elections?

General local elections and by-elections are held by:

  • municipalities (Mayor and Councillors);
  • regional districts (Electoral Area Directors);
  • boards of education (School Trustees);
  • Islands Trust (Islands Trust Trustees);
  • local community commissions (Commissioners); and,
  • park boards (Commissioners).
  • Who runs local elections?

    Each jurisdiction (municipality, regional district, school district, Islands Trust, local community commission and park board) is responsible for running its own election.

    Each jurisdiction appoints a local Chief Election Officer who is responsible for conducting the election in accordance with the local election bylaws, and the:

  • Local Government Act
  • Local Elections Campaign Financing Act
  • Community Charter
  • School Act
  • Vancouver Charter (as applicable)
  • Offence Act


  • A local government may also run school trustee elections on behalf of a board of education.

    Who do I ask questions about the election process?

    Contact a local Chief Election Officer Ė they are likely the most familiar with the specific circumstances in your community.

    Contact the Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development, Advisory Services at 250 387-4020 or visit the Ministry election home page for answers to questions about local election administration.

    Where can I find information about Board of Education elections?

    Contact a board of education administrator Ė they are likely the most familiar with the specific circumstances in your community.

    Contact the Ministry of Education Governance and Legislation Unit, Knowledge Management and Accountability Division at 250 356-1404 or by email at: EDUC.Governance.Legislation@gov.bc.ca for answers to questions about board of education election administration.

    What is the local Chief Election Officer's role in local elections?

    The local Chief Election Officer is responsible for conducting by-elections and general elections in accordance with the Local Government Act, the Local Elections Campaign Financing Act, the Community Charter, the School Act, the Vancouver Charter, the Offence Act and the local government election bylaw.

    The local Chief Election Officer is responsible for overseeing all local election administration activities such as declaring candidates, setting up voting opportunities, counting votes and declaring the election results. The local Chief Election Officer is also responsible for training the Deputy Chief Election Officer, Presiding Election Officials and any additional election officials required to conduct the local government election.

    The local Chief Election Officer also works with Elections BC to monitor compliance with election advertising regulations, and may assist Elections BC to address incidents of non-compliance.

    Local Chief Election Officers are not responsible for the conduct of candidates, and do not investigate alleged election offences or administer penalties.

    What is Election BCs role in local elections?

    Elections BC is a non-partisan, independent Office of the Legislature that is responsible for managing campaign financing disclosure requirements, investigations, and enforcing the campaign financing and election advertising provisions set out in the Local Elections Campaign Financing Act.

    Elections BC provides information and advice about election advertising, campaign financing and third party sponsors. Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for more information about its role in local elections.

    Who declares the election results and where can I find the results?

    The official election results may not necessarily be announced on general voting day Ė the local Chief Election Officer may announce preliminary results after concluding the ballot count on general voting day and announce the official results at a later date.

    November 19, 2014 is the deadline for declaring the official election results in the 2014 general local election.

    Most local governments post election results on their websites and election results are also posted on the CivicInfoBC website at www.civicinfo.bc.ca

    Who enforces general local election rules?

    The police are responsible for investigating alleged election offences, and the Courts are responsible for adjudicating allegations, making decisions and imposing penalties under the Local Government Act.

    The local Chief Election Officer has the authority to enforce election rules, such as the challenge of a candidateís nomination or elector eligibility, and to maintain order at voting places such as the prohibition of campaign activity within 100 metres of a voting place on voting day. Election officials also have the authority to challenge an electorís ability to vote on the basis that they are not entitled to vote or that they accepted an inducement to vote.

    Elections BC is a non-partisan, independent Office of the Legislature that is responsible for managing campaign financing disclosure requirements, investigations, and enforcing the campaign financing, and election advertising provisions set out in the Local Elections Campaign Financing Act.

    Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for more information about its role in local elections.

    What can I do if I believe someone has committed an election offence?

    Contact your local police if you believe someone has committed an election offence. The police are responsible for conducting an investigation and recommending to Crown counsel whether charges should be laid. Election offences are prosecuted through the judicial system.

    The local government Chief Election Officer does not investigate alleged election offences.

    Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca if you believe someone has committed an election campaign financing offense.

     

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    Voter Questions


    Voter Eligibility

    Am I eligible to vote?

    You are eligible to vote in a local election as a resident elector if you:
    • are 18 years of age or older when you register to vote or will be 18 years of age or older on general voting day;
    • are a Canadian citizen;
    • have been a resident of British Columbia for at least six months before you register to vote;
    • have lived in the jurisdiction where you intend to vote for at least 30 days before you register to vote; and,
    • are not disqualified under the Local Government Act, or any other enactment from voting in a local election, or are otherwise disqualified by law.

    You are eligible to vote as a non-resident property elector if you:

    • are 18 years of age or older when you register to vote or will be 18 years of age or older on general voting day;
    • are a Canadian citizen;
    • have been a resident of British Columbia for at least six months before you register to vote;
    • have owned property in the jurisdiction in which you intend to vote for at least 30 days before registering to vote; and,
    • are not disqualified under the Local Government Act, or any other enactment from voting in a local election, or are otherwise disqualified by law.

    Who cannot vote in a local election?

    You cannot vote in a local election (as either a resident elector or a non-resident property elector) when you:
    • have been convicted of an indictable offence and are in custody; or,
    • have been found guilty of an election offence, such as intimidation or vote-buying; or,
    • do not otherwise meet voter eligibility requirements.

    I live on a First Nations reserve. Can I vote in a local government election?

    Yes. Eligible electors living on reserve can vote.

    Where you vote depends on whether the reserve is located within a municipal or regional district jurisdiction. Contact the appropriate municipality or regional district to determine where you can vote.

    I live in one local government jurisdiction, and I own property in another - can I vote in both jurisdictions?

    Yes.You may vote in the jurisdiction where you live when you qualify as a resident elector.

    You are also eligible to vote as a non-resident property elector in another jurisdiction when you have owned the property in the other jurisdiction for at least 30 days before registering to vote.

    I own more than one property - can I vote more than once?

    You may vote only once as a non-resident property elector when you own two or more properties within one jurisdiction.

    You may vote in multiple jurisdictions when you have owned property within each jurisdiction for at least 30 days before registering to vote.

    I own property with another person and neither of us lives on the property - can both of us vote?

    No. Only one non-resident property elector may vote per property. When you own a property with another person(s), the majority of owners must designate Ė in writing Ė one owner to vote as the non-resident property elector for that property.

    No one is eligible to vote in relation to property owned through or in conjunction with a corporation.

    I own property with another person and we both live on the property - can both of us vote?

    You may both vote as resident electors if you meet the voter eligibility requirements.

    I own property in B.C. and live in a different province or country - can I vote?

    No. You must be a resident of British Columbia for at least six months before you register to vote.

    I live in one jurisdiction and attend school in a different one - can I vote in both places?

    No. You can only vote in one jurisdiction when you live away from your usual place of residence to attend an educational institution. You may choose to vote either where you attend school or your usual place of residence.

    I live in one jurisdiction and work for extended periods of time in a different one - can I vote in both places?

    No. You can only vote in one jurisdiction when you live away from your usual place of residence and work for extended periods of time in another jurisdiction. You must vote in the jurisdiction where you maintain your usual place of residence.

    I own a company - do I get an extra vote in a local election?

    No. There is no corporate or business vote in local government elections.

    Voting rights are granted to citizens on the basis of residency or property ownership. This means you cannot vote on behalf of a corporation or business, and you cannot vote as a non-resident property elector on behalf of a property owned wholly or in part by a corporation.

    Am I allowed to look at the voter's list?

    Yes. You can view the voterís list at the local government office during regular office hours if the local government is using a voterís list.

    You can view the list between September 30 and November 15 for the 2014 general local election. You must sign a statement saying that you will not inspect or use the information on the voterís list except for the purposes of the election.

    You are only entitled to receive a copy of the voterís list if you are a candidate in a local election.

    What can I do if I think someone on the voter's list is not eligible to vote?

    You may only object to a personís name appearing on the voterís list if you are a qualified elector, and if the person whose name appears on the list has died or is not qualified to be an elector.

    You must submit a written, signed objection to the local Chief Election Officer before 4:00 p.m. local time on Friday, October 10, 2014.

    The person against whom the objection was made will be notified (if possible) by the local Chief Election Officer and given a chance to provide evidence that he or she is an eligible elector and therefore entitled to be on the voterís list.

    Can I have my personal information removed from the voter's list?

    Yes. You can request that your name, address, or any other information be removed or obscured from the voterís list that is available for public inspection and for use by candidates.

    Your name will remain on the voterís list used at all voting opportunities held by the local government.

    Contact the local Chief Election Officer where you intend to vote to request that your name, address or any other information be removed or obscured from the voterís list.


    Voting

    How do I register to vote?

    Provincial Voters List: some local governments use the provincial voterís list from the most recent provincial election. You are already registered to vote in a general local election if the local government uses the provincial voterís list and your name appears on it. You are not required to show identification to receive a ballot in a general local election if your name appears on the provincial voterís list.

    Voterís List: some local governments offer advance voter registration if they are using their own voterís list. Contact your local government to find out if this option is available and how to register. You can register with your local government until September 23, 2014 if advance registration is available.

    Same Day Registration: you can also register to vote at a voting place. You must provide two pieces of identification proving who you are and where you live. One of the pieces of identification must also include your signature. You must also provide the address or legal description and the title (or other proof of ownership) of the property you are registering to vote in relation to if you are registering as a non-resident property elector. If you own the property with other people, you need their written consent to vote on their behalf.

    Can I register to vote on voting day?

    Yes. You will be required to provide two pieces of identification proving who you are and where you live. One of the pieces of identification must also include your signature. You can make what is called a solemn declaration as to your place of residence if your identification does not show your residential address. The voting clerk will have the form you need to make the declaration.

    You must also provide the address or legal description and the title (or other proof of ownership) of the property you own if you are registering as a non-resident property elector. If you own the property with other people, you need their written consent to vote on their behalf.

    Contact the appropriate local government for information about whether or not identification is required and what type of identification (e.g. driverís license, social insurance card) will be accepted.

    I won't be here on general voting day. How can I vote?

    Every local government must have at least one advance voting opportunity on the Wednesday 10 days before general voting day. The required advance voting day is November 5, 2014 for the 2014 general local election.

    Many local governments have more than one advance voting opportunity. Contact your local government for details of advance voting or to find out if your local government offers mail ballot voting.

    Can I vote by mail?

    Some local governments allow for mail ballot voting when electors cannot physically attend a voting place or will be out of town on advance and general voting days. Contact your local government to see if mail ballot voting is available.

    Can I vote on the Internet?

    No. The legislation does not allow for voting via the Internet.

    Can I vote by telephone?

    No. The legislation does not allow for voting by telephone.

    How will I know where to vote?

    Your local government is required to publish notices of voting places in the local newspaper.

    You can also visit the local government website or contact your municipal, regional district, board of education or Islands Trust office.

    How do I mark the ballot?

    There will be instructions at the voting place explaining how to mark the ballot.

    Can I have a translator help me vote?

    Yes. The person translating for you must sign a solemn declaration before providing any assistance. Speak to the presiding election official at the voting place for further information.

    Can I take someone into the voting booth to help me?

    Yes. All jurisdictions are required to make voting places as accessible as reasonably possible. You may:
    • ask a local election official to bring you a ballot if you can travel to a voting place and find it difficult to get into the building or room where voting is taking place (this is called ďcurb-sideĒ voting);
    • ask a local election official, friend or relative to help you if you are unable to mark your own ballot. The person providing assistance to another elector must sign a solemn declaration before providing assistance; or,
    • bring someone to assist you if you need a translator. The translator must be capable of making a solemn declaration that they can and will make the translation to the best of their ability. The local election official may allow you to have a person in the booth with you if you are caring for someone (e.g. a child or elderly relative) at the time you cast your ballot.
    Speak to the presiding election official at the voting place for further information.

    Am I allowed to assist someone to vote who has a physical disability or other difficulty?

    Yes. You must sign a written statement and a solemn declaration in order to assist someone to vote. Speak to the presiding election official at the voting place for further information.

     

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    Candidate Questions


    Candidate Eligibility

    Can I run for local office?

    To be an eligible candidate you must:
    • be 18 years of age or older on general voting day;
    • be a Canadian citizen;
    • have lived in British Columbia for at least six months before filing your nomination documents;
    • not be disqualified under the Local Government Act or any other enactment from being nominated for, being elected to or holding office, or be otherwise disqualified by law.
    You do not have to live or own property in the jurisdiction in which you are running for office.

    For more information on candidate eligibility and requirements, contact the local Chief Election Officer or see the Candidate's Guide to Local Government Elections in B.C. (.PDF, 828KB).

    Who is disqualified from running for local office?

    A person is not eligible to run as a candidate for any local office if they:
    • have been convicted of an indictable offence and are in custody;
    • are involuntarily confined to a psychiatric facility or other institution;
    • are judges of the Provincial Court, Supreme Court or Court of Appeal;
    • are employees or salaried officers of the local government, including volunteers who are paid for their services, unless they have taken a leave of absence and agree to resign if elected;
    • are federal employees unless they have prior approval from the Public Service Commission of Canada to run for office;
    • have been found guilty of an election offence, such as intimidation or buying votes, and are prohibited from holding office; or
    • have been disqualified for failing to:
      • file a candidate disclosure statement in a previous election;
      • make an oath of office; or,
      • attend meetings for 60 consecutive days or four consecutive regularly scheduled meetings, without being granted permission by the municipal council or regional district board, unless the absence is due to illness or injury.
    Contact the local Chief Election Officer or see the Candidate's Guide to Local Government Elections in B.C. for more information on candidate eligibility and requirements.

    Can I live in one local government jurisdiction and run in another?

    Yes. You do not have to live or own property in the jurisdiction in which you are running for office.

    Contact the local Chief Election Officer or see the Candidate's Guide to Local Government Elections in B.C. (.PDF, 828KB) for more information on candidate eligibility and requirements.

    Does employment affect my eligibility to be a candidate in a general local election?

    Yes. As a local government employee or salaried officer, you may run in a general local election if you provide written notice to your employer and take a leave of absence starting that day or on the first day of the nomination process. You must also resign your employment if elected.

    You must take a leave of absence and resign if elected if you are:
    • an employee running for elected office in the municipality in which you are employed;
    • an employee seeking election as an electoral area director in the regional district of which your municipal employer is a member;
    • a regional district employee seeking to be elected as a mayor or councillor of a municipality that is a member of the regional district;
    • an employee of a municipality within the Islands Trust seeking to be elected as a local trustee; and,
    • an employee of the Islands Trust seeking to be elected as the mayor or councillor of any municipality in the Trust area.
    Contact the local Chief Election Officer to discuss your eligibility.

    If I am a federal public servant considering being a candidate for local office, do I need permission?

    Yes. Before seeking nomination as, or being, a candidate in a municipal election, federal public servants subject to the political activities provisions (Part 7) of the Public Service Employment Act are required to obtain permission from the Public Service Commission (PSC) and, if applicable, a leave of absence without pay during the election period.

    To find out more about your legal rights and responsibilities regarding political activities visit www.psc-cfp.gc.ca/plac-acpl/index-eng.htm. You can also contact the PSC by telephone at 1-866-707-7152, or by e-mail for more information.


    Nominations

    How many people do I need to nominate me as a candidate?

    You must have a minimum of two eligible nominators from the local government jurisdiction in which you wish to run.

    Local governments may require more than two eligible nominators Ė up to 10 nominators. 25 eligible nominators may be required in jurisdictions with more than 5,000 people.

    Contact the local Chief Election Officer to determine the number of nominators required.

    Do I have to pay a fee to be a candidate?

    Local governments may require you to pay a refundable nomination deposit (maximum $100). These deposits are refunded when you file your candidate disclosure statement with Elections BC by the required deadline.

    Contact the local Chief Election Office or school board administrator to see if a deposit is required.

    Where can I get nomination documents?

    Nomination packages are generally available from the local Chief Election Officer at the local government office during regular business hours two to four weeks before the nomination period begins.

    Nomination packages are available throughout the nomination period, September 30 to October 10 for the 2014 general local election.

    Where do I submit my nomination documents?

    Your nomination documents must be submitted to the local Chief Election Officer or their designate by the close of nominations at 4:00 p.m. local time on October 10 for the 2014 general local election.

    Can I file my nomination documents by fax or email?

    Yes. Your nomination documents may be filed by fax or email during the nomination period. However, original copies of the documents must be submitted by 4:00 p.m. local time on October 17 for the 2014 general local election.

    Can I fill out my nomination forms before the nomination period and have someone else submit them for me during the nomination period?

    Yes. You can fill out the forms and make your solemn declaration before the nomination period and have someone else submit them to the local Chief Election Officer during the nomination period.

    You must be available during the nomination period in case any changes to the forms are required by the local Chief Election Officer.

    Where do I send nomination document updates?

    Any changes you make to your nomination documents after election results were declared must be sent directly to Elections BC.

    Election results must be declared by November 19 for the 2014 general local election. Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for information about nomination document updates.

    When do I need to file my Statement of Financial Disclosure?

    As a candidate you must complete a financial disclosure form in accordance with the Financial Disclosure Act at the time you file your nomination documents. If you are elected, you will also have to file annual disclosure statements between January 1 and 15 each year as well as when you leave your elected office.

    The Financial Disclosure Act statements are different from the campaign financing disclosure statements, which you are required to file following a general local election or by-election.

    The Financial Disclosure Act is administered by the Ministry of Justice. Further information about financial disclosure is available from Ministry of Justice and the required Statement of Financial Disclosure form is available from local governments across B.C.

    How do I make a solemn declaration to be a candidate?

    You must make a solemn declaration that:
    • you are qualified to run for office;
    • the information you provided on the nomination documents is true;
    • you will accept the office if elected; and,
    • you are aware of, understand the requirements and restrictions of the Local Elections Campaign Financing Act, and you intend to comply with the Act.
    You can make the solemn declaration in advance with a Commissioner for Taking Affidavits in B.C. (e.g. lawyer or notary public) or before the local Chief Election Officer or designate when you deliver your nomination documents.

    How many people can be nominated as candidates in a local election?

    There is no set limit as to how many people can be nominated for local government office. Only eligible resident elector or non-resident property electors can nominate candidates in a local election.

    Can the public look at my nomination documents?

    Yes. The public can view a candidateís nomination documents at the local government offices during regular office hours from the time they were submitted to the local government until 30 days following the declaration of election results. A local government may also make nomination documents available at other locations or by other means, such as on its website.

    Contact your local government to find out how nomination documents can be viewed by the public.

    Can I decide I don't want to be a candidate after submitting my nomination papers?

    Yes. You can withdraw from the election by notifying the local Chief Election Officer in writing. The withdrawl deadline for the 2014 general local election is 4:00 p.m. local time on October 17.

    The Minister of Community, Sport and Cultural Development must approve any request for withdrawal after the October 17, 2014 deadline before the local Chief Election Officer can remove your name from the ballot.

    Contact the local Chief Election Officer for further information about withdrawing a nomination.


    Election Campaigns & Advertsing

    What is the campaign period?

    The campaign period for a general local election begins at the start of the calendar year in which the general local election is held and ends at the close of voting on general voting day.

    The campaign period runs from January 1 to November 15 for the 2014 general local election.

    Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for more information about the campaign period.

    What is the election proceedings period?

    The election proceedings period runs from September 30 to November 15 for the 2014 general local election.

    Rules in relation to election advertising and third party advertising as defined in the Local Elections Campaign Financing Act come into effect during this period.

    Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for more information about the election proceedings period.

    When can I start campaigning?

    You can begin election campaigning as soon as you choose to do so. However all campaign contributions and election expenses must be recorded in relation to a particular election.

    See Elections BCís Guide to Local Elections Campaign Financing in B.C. and Third Party Sponsor Guide to Local Elections in B.C. available online at: www.elections.bc.ca for more information about campaign period and election proceedings period requirements.

    Can I request a copy of the voter's list to use for my campaign?

    Yes. Each candidate is entitled to one free copy of a list of registered electors (voterís list) if one is used by the local government.

    You must agree in writing that the voterís list will only be used for the purposes of the election before receiving the list.

    The voterís list may only be used for election campaign-related purposes, e.g. door-knocking, flyer distribution, calling eligible voters to remind them to vote. You must use the voterís list carefully given the information it contains. The list must be returned to the local government or destroyed following the general local election.

    Are there rules about signs in local elections?

    Candidates must comply with the legislated election advertising under the Local Elections Campaign Financing Act during the election proceedings period (September 30 to November 15, 2014).

    Campaign signs or materials are prohibited within 100 metres of any voting place. This includes buttons worn by supporters, bumper stickers, pamphlets, posters, or any other material that advocates for or against a particular candidate(s). Local election officials have authority to remove any signs or campaign materials found within 100 metres of a voting place on a voting day.

    Most local governments have bylaws governing the placement of signs, including election signs, within their jurisdiction. Contact your local government for more information.

    The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure has authority over provincial roads and highways, and may have rules regarding the placement of signs adjacent to these roads and highways.

    See Elections BCís Guide to Local Elections Campaign Financing in B.C. and Third Party Sponsor Guide to Local Elections in B.C. available online at: www.elections.bc.ca for more information.

    What information is now required on my signs and advertising?

    Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for information about signs and advertising requirements during the election proceedings period (September 30 to November 15, 2014).

    Can I set up and use a web site as part of my election campaign?

    Yes. You can use a website during an election campaign; however, any expenses related to setting up and operating the web site must be recorded and disclosed on your candidate disclosure statement.

    Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for information about election advertising during the election proceedings period.

    Can I use YouTube, Twitter and Facebook as part of my election campaign?

    Yes. You can use social media during an election campaign.

    Any expenses related to setting up and operating a social media campaign must be recorded and disclosed as part of your candidate disclosure statement.

    Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for information about election advertising during the election proceedings period.

    Can I advertise on general voting day?

    No. Broadcast (television, radio) and print (newspapers, magazines) advertising are prohibited on general voting day. Be sure that your ad does not appear on general voting day if you advertise in a weekly newspaper that is distributed on a Saturday.

    Who do I contact for information about election advertising?

    Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for information about election advertising.

    Who do I contact for information about campaign financing?

    Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for information about campaign financing.

     


    Elector Organizations


    What is an elector organization?
    Generally, elector organizations are formed to promote a candidate, slate of candidates or a point of view by endorsing candidates on the ballot and advertising for or in conjunction with candidates. Only elector organizations can endorse a candidate(s) on the ballot.

    Elector organizations are occasionally referred to as civic political parties. Elector organizations do not have to incorporate as a company or a society.

    Electoral organizations must have a membership of 50 or more eligible electors at the time of endorsement, and follow procedures under the Local Government Act, Local Elections Campaign Financing Act, and the Vancouver Charter (as applicable).

    Campaign financing and election advertising rules also apply to elector organization election campaigns. Every elector organization must appoint a financial agent to ensure the financial aspects of the election campaign are run in accordance with Local Elections Campaign Financing Act.

    Elector organizations must submit disclosure statements to Elections BC for each jurisdiction in which they run an election campaign.

    See the Elector Organization Guide to Local Government Elections in B.C. (.PDF, 810KB) for more information on elector organizations. See Elections BCís Guide to Local Elections Campaign Financing in B.C. available online at www.elections.bc.ca for information about the elector organization campaign financing disclosure process.
    How can I get an endorsement on the ballot?
    Elector organizations can endorse you on the ballot.

    The elector organization must submit all the required information during the nomination period to the local Chief Election Officer.

    You must consent to the endorsement by signing endorsement documents submitted by the elector organization.

    See the Elector Organization Guide to Local Government Elections in B.C. (.PDF, 810KB) for more information about elector organization responsibilities, requirements and endorsement.
    What became of campaign organizers?
    Campaign organizers are no longer regulated under the Local Government Act.

    Activities that were typically undertaken by campaign organizers under the previous campaign financing rules will likely be captured as third party advertising under the Local Elections Campaign Financing Act.

    Individuals or organizations that were campaign organizers prior to the enactment of the Local Elections Campaign Financing Act (May 29, 2014) are not permitted to receive campaign contributions or incur election expenses for the 2014 general local election.

    Campaign organizers are still required to file a disclosure statement with Elections BC detailing any contributions received or expenses incurred in relation to the 2014 general local election prior to the Local Elections Campaign Financing Act coming into force.

     


     

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